Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics

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Recent news

  • Nobel Laureate in Chemistry visited Stockholm University 2018-12-11 George P. Smith, one of the Nobel Laureates in Chemistry 2018, visited Stockholm University and the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. He held a lecture for PhD students and answered questions about his research and how his interest in chemistry began.
  • Structure reveals new routes to target tuberculosis 2018-12-06 New research has revealed the structure of a large respiratory complex from a closely related species of the deadly human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which infects the lungs. This new structure provides many routes to develop novel therapies to combat this deadly disease. The study is published in the scientific journal Nature Structural and Molecular Biology.
  • Accumulation of undegraded peptides in mitochondria and chloroplasts conveys toxic signals 2018-11-20 Researchers from Stockholm University in collaboration with scientists from La Trobe University in Melbourne, University of Western Australia in Perth and Karolinska Institute discovered that accumulation of undegraded peptides in mitochondria and chloroplasts as a result of lack of the organellar peptidases triggers the activation of the classical plant defense response in the absence of a pathogen.
  • Marta Carroni at DBB has been named one of the 2018 female innovators. 2018-11-20 Marta Carroni at the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics has been one of the 2018 female innovators named by the Italian Association of Women Inventors and Innovators (ITWIIN) for her contributions to the development of electron cryo-microscopy in Sweden.
  • New inflammation inhibitor discovered 2018-11-16 A multidisciplinary team of researchers from Karolinska Institutet, University of Texas, Uppsala University and Stockholm University have developed an anti-inflammatory drug molecule with a new mechanism of action. By inhibiting a certain protein (OGG1), the researchers were able to reduce the signals that trigger an inflammation. The study is published in Science.
  • A radical new way to make DNA 2018-11-01 New research reveals that Mycoplasma pathogens make DNA in a unique way that may protect them from our immune response. The result could provide new avenues to combat the pathogens that utilize this strategy. The study is published today in the scientific journal Nature.